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27 tools found.

The CFF has compiled this toolkit in collaboration with eThekwini Municipality (Durban) to guide practitioners, decision-and policy-makers, and anyone interested in the topic, on how to improve the overall health of rivers. The toolkit comprises both grey infrastructure (i.e. human-engineered hard structures, such as gabions) and light-touch grey infrastructure (i.e. ecologically-friendly engineering solutions, such as wetland construction and brush packing). Each intervention option is accompanied by a specifications sheet with relevant information for planning, designing, financing and implementation. Whilst the interventions proposed in the toolkit are focused on the Kwa-Zulu Natal context, they can be applied elsewhere following the appropriate contextualisation process.

Sector(s): Natural Infrastructure
Lifecycle Phase(s): Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., Project PlanningGeneral strategy for a project’s delivery is developed.
Type(s) of Tool: GuidelinesOperationalize sustainability principles, less specific than Benchmarks or Rating Systems.
Organization: C40 Cities Finance Facility

The principles focus on the inclusion of vulnerable transport users in rural, peri-urban, low-income and urban areas across Europe and beyond. Over a three-year period, the EU-funded INCLUSION project addressed the challenges of accessibility to public transport in those areas. The experience gained from this project has been condensed into the principles, which provide guidance to local authorities, planners, and practitioners that strive to make mobility more inclusive, accessible and fair for all types of users.

Sector(s): Transportation
Lifecycle Phase(s): Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., Project PlanningGeneral strategy for a project’s delivery is developed., Concept DesignTechnical experts broadly outline the project’s basic characteristics.
Type(s) of Tool: PrinciplesSupport sustainability incorporation at institutional or strategic level, less specific than Guidelines.
Organization: Inclusion (European Union Horizon 2020)

The Gender Toolkit provides guidance for transport sector specialists and gender specialists on how to mainstream gender equality issues into transport project design, implementation, and policy engagement. It supports users in designing project outputs, activities, inputs, indicators, and targets to respond to gender issues in transport sector operations. The tool kit is divided into key subsectors of ADB’s transport sector investments: rural roads, national highways, railways, urban transport and services, bridges, and waterbased transport and ports.

Sector(s): Transportation
Lifecycle Phase(s): Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., Project PlanningGeneral strategy for a project’s delivery is developed., Concept DesignTechnical experts broadly outline the project’s basic characteristics.
Type(s) of Tool: Project Preparation ToolsHelp public authorities manage sustainable project preparation processes.
Organization: Asian Development Bank (ADB)

This guidance on gender mainstreaming in transport and roads provides specific ‘how-to’ guidance together with checklists across the project lifespan in four subsectors (roads, non-motorized transport and pedestrian infrastructure, transport systems, and ports), with context-specific Asia and Pacific regional information and case studies to showcase what socially-inclusive and gender-equitable infrastructure designs look like on the ground. It is part of a practical series of how-to guides and checklists specific to the Asia-Pacific region.

Sector(s): Transportation
Lifecycle Phase(s): Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., Project PlanningGeneral strategy for a project’s delivery is developed., Concept DesignTechnical experts broadly outline the project’s basic characteristics., ProcurementThe provision of goods and services to realize a project are tendered and closed., FinanceDevelopers decide how to pay for their project., Detailed DesignTechnical experts further elaborate the Concept Design., ConstructionThe asset is constructed in line with design, budget and timeline., Operation and MaintenanceInfrastructure assets are managed and maintained during their use time.
Type(s) of Tool: GuidelinesOperationalize sustainability principles, less specific than Benchmarks or Rating Systems.
Organization: UN Women, UNOPS

This guide introduces to the United Nations gender mainstreaming principles; why it is important to mainstream gender; the business case for gender mainstreaming; and an overview of the project life cycle. The document describes in detail each stage of the project life cycle and addresses key gender mainstreaming and social inclusion considerations. It is part of a practical series of how-to guides and checklists specific to the Asia-Pacific region.

Sector(s):
Lifecycle Phase(s): Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., Project PlanningGeneral strategy for a project’s delivery is developed., Concept DesignTechnical experts broadly outline the project’s basic characteristics., ProcurementThe provision of goods and services to realize a project are tendered and closed., FinanceDevelopers decide how to pay for their project., Detailed DesignTechnical experts further elaborate the Concept Design., ConstructionThe asset is constructed in line with design, budget and timeline., Operation and MaintenanceInfrastructure assets are managed and maintained during their use time.
Type(s) of Tool: GuidelinesOperationalize sustainability principles, less specific than Benchmarks or Rating Systems.
Organization: UN Women, UNOPS

The TOD (transit-oriented development) Standard focuses on maximizing the benefits of public transit and non-motorized mobility while placing the emphasis firmly back on the users. The standard outlines eight core principles of urban design and land use, each supported by specific performance objectives and easily measurable indicators, or metrics. Together, they promote safe, balanced and vibrant neighborhoods around stations; short and well-connected pedestrian and cycling networks; densities that ensure strong customer bases for local services and public transport; and minimal car traffic and parking interference.

Sector(s): Urban Planning, Transportation
Lifecycle Phase(s): Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., Project PlanningGeneral strategy for a project’s delivery is developed., Concept DesignTechnical experts broadly outline the project’s basic characteristics.
Type(s) of Tool: PrinciplesSupport sustainability incorporation at institutional or strategic level, less specific than Guidelines.
Organization: Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) 

The document provides guidelines regarding best practices for the construction of multimodal transport hubs with a particular focus on the inclusion of governance, digitalization and gender aspects in the planning process. The term multimodal transport hubs (MTH) refers to a building and an urban space, and translates into different realities, functions and practices on the ground. In cities of the Global South, interchange hubs can take the form of railway stations, underground stations, urban bus terminals or simple stops connected to other, sometimes informal, transport networks.

Sector(s): Transportation
Lifecycle Phase(s): Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., Project PlanningGeneral strategy for a project’s delivery is developed., Concept DesignTechnical experts broadly outline the project’s basic characteristics.
Type(s) of Tool: GuidelinesOperationalize sustainability principles, less specific than Benchmarks or Rating Systems.
Organization: Agence française de développement (AFD)

The PPP Reference Guide helps users to navigate the abundant knowledge on Public Private Partnerships. The Guide introduces key topics on PPP, sets forth options and directs users to implementation examples and references. The three modules of the Guide (1) explain the reasons for using PPPs, (2) point to the necessary policy, legal and institutional frameworks to ensure that PPPs achieve their objectives and (3) provide an overview of the development and implementation processes of PPPs.

Sector(s): Tools applicable to all sectors
Lifecycle Phase(s): Enabling EnvironmentConditions that enable the integration of sustainability practices (regulation, laws, frameworks etc.)., Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., ProcurementThe provision of goods and services to realize a project are tendered and closed., FinanceDevelopers decide how to pay for their project.
Type(s) of Tool: Rating SystemsProvide quantifiable sustainability ratings and / or certification for projects or assets.
Organization: World Bank

The report “A Common Set of Aligned Sustainable Infrastructure Indicators (SII)” identifies the sixteen common elements used by multilateral development banks to define sustainable infrastructure practices across the quadruple bottom line. The SII provides insights into how stakeholders can incorporate the indicators into their infrastructure projects and monitor sustainability performance throughout the infrastructure lifecycle. Moreover, the SII sets forth how reaching the sustainability indicators can help mobilize public and private investments.

Sector(s): Tools applicable to all sectors
Lifecycle Phase(s): Enabling EnvironmentConditions that enable the integration of sustainability practices (regulation, laws, frameworks etc.)., Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., Project PlanningGeneral strategy for a project’s delivery is developed., Concept DesignTechnical experts broadly outline the project’s basic characteristics., ProcurementThe provision of goods and services to realize a project are tendered and closed., FinanceDevelopers decide how to pay for their project.
Type(s) of Tool: PrinciplesSupport sustainability incorporation at institutional or strategic level, less specific than Guidelines.
Organization: MDB Infrastructure Cooperation Platform

The Attributes and Framework for Sustainable Infrastructure contributes to developing a shared understanding of the key dimensions and attributes that together define sustainable infrastructure, based on the propositions that sustainability of infrastructure must consider the benefits and costs of investment over the entire lifecycle and that sustainability must be assessed across all relevant dimensions (economic / financial, environmental, social and institutional). The paper then sets out the detailed attributes that constitute the elements of each of these four dimensions.

Sector(s): Tools applicable to all sectors
Lifecycle Phase(s): Enabling EnvironmentConditions that enable the integration of sustainability practices (regulation, laws, frameworks etc.)., Strategic PlanningPublic authorities identify the needs and long-term vision for infrastructure development., PrioritizationAuthorities decide which projects to realize and how to allocate resources., Project PlanningGeneral strategy for a project’s delivery is developed., Concept DesignTechnical experts broadly outline the project’s basic characteristics., ProcurementThe provision of goods and services to realize a project are tendered and closed., FinanceDevelopers decide how to pay for their project.
Type(s) of Tool: PrinciplesSupport sustainability incorporation at institutional or strategic level, less specific than Guidelines.
Organization: Inter-American Development Bank IDB